Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Republicans: The Party of "No"

An interesting op-ed by Thomas Friedman can be found here, at the New York Times. An excerpt:

"[. . .] Watching both the health care and climate/energy debates in Congress, it is hard not to draw the following conclusion: There is only one thing worse than one-party autocracy, and that is one-party democracy, which is what we have in America today. [. . .]

[. . .] The fact is, on both the energy/climate legislation and health care legislation, only the Democrats are really playing. With a few notable exceptions, the Republican Party is standing, arms folded and saying “no.” Many of them just want President Obama to fail. Such a waste. Mr. Obama is not a socialist; he’s a centrist. But if he’s forced to depend entirely on his own party to pass legislation, he will be whipsawed by its different factions. [. . .]

[. . .] Can the Republicans even say yes to their own ideas, if they are absorbed by Obama? [. . .]

[. . .] “Just because Obama is on a path to give America the Romney health plan with McCain-style financing, does not mean the Republicans will embrace it — if it seems politically more attractive to scream ‘socialist,’ ” said Miller.

The G.O.P. used to be the party of business. Well, to compete and win in a globalized world, no one needs the burden of health insurance shifted from business to government more than American business. No one needs immigration reform — so the world’s best brainpower can come here without restrictions — more than American business. No one needs a push for clean-tech — the world’s next great global manufacturing industry — more than American business. Yet the G.O.P. today resists national health care, immigration reform and wants to just drill, baby, drill.

“Globalization has neutered the Republican Party, leaving it to represent not the have-nots of the recession but the have-nots of globalized America, the people who have been left behind either in reality or in their fears,” said Edward Goldberg, a global trade consultant who teaches at Baruch College. “The need to compete in a globalized world has forced the meritocracy, the multinational corporate manager, the eastern financier and the technology entrepreneur to reconsider what the Republican Party has to offer. In principle, they have left the party, leaving behind not a pragmatic coalition but a group of ideological naysayers.” [. . .]"

UPDATE: In the Party's efforts to oppose everything Obama states, they do not appear to let facts to the contrary get in their way. Details here.

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Monday, September 07, 2009

Studies in Global Justice and Human Rights

Studies in Global Justice and Human Rights

Series Editor: Thom Brooks


‘Global justice and human rights’ is perhaps the hottest topic today. Studies in Global Justice and Human Rights is a new book series published by Edinburgh University Press. The series aims to publish groundbreaking work in this increasingly popular field. This series will publish leading monographs and edited collections on key topics in the area of global justice and human rights that will be of broad interest to theorists working in politics, international relations, philosophy, and related disciplines.

Topics of particular importance are democracy, global gender justice, global justice, global poverty, human rights, international environmental justice, and just war theory amongst others. This series aspires to publish the leading work in this area with broad interdisciplinary appeal. EUP books are distributed in North America by various presses, including Columbia University Press, the University of Chicago Press, Palgrave Macmillan, and others.

Expressions of interest are most welcome and should be directed to the series editor, Thom Brooks.

The series is related to the Global Justice and Human Rights Group.

Textbooks in Global Justice and Human Rights

Textbooks in Global Justice and Human Rights

Series Editor: Thom Brooks

‘Global justice and human rights’ is perhaps the hottest topic today. Textbooks in Global Justice and Human Rights is a new book series published by Edinburgh University Press. The series aims to publish groundbreaking work in this increasingly popular field. This series will publish leading introductory textbooks on key topics in the area of global justice and human rights that will be of broad interest to both undergraduate and graduate students in politics, international relations, philosophy, and related disciplines.

We are particularly interested in publishing work in the fields of
· global justice
· human rights
· women and global justice
· global justice and global poverty
· international environmental philosophy
This series aspires to publish the leading textbooks in this area with broad interdisciplinary appeal.

Expressions of interest are most welcome and should be directed to the series editor, Thom Brooks. EUP books are distributed in North America by various presses, including Columbia University Press, the University of Chicago Press, Palgrave Macmillan, and others.

The series springs from the Global Justice and Human Rights Group.

Martha Nussbaum on college advice in the NY Times

. . . can be found here. Short, but on the spot.

The Philosophers' Carnival XCVI

Welcome to the Philosophers' Carnival!

Go on. Pick a tent. There is lots in store!

Tent #1

In the first tent, we have an interesting post on the problem of evil from MandM in part one and part two. Another day, another problem . . .

Tent #2

Over at the second tent, we see It's Only a Theory discussing the question of whether scientific methods and data should be made public here. Of course, you can always go here if you really want to make your mind spin . . . Now if only I knew the method behind my madness . . .

Tent #3

Getting confused amongst so many tempts? Now only if there was an instrumental way to guide oneself through . . . Wait. I've got it. We're in the right tent after all: here we find "King" Richard Chappell at Philosophy Etc discussing 'The Mark of the Instrumental' (and the distinction between instrinsic and instrumental value) here. Intrinsically interesting for instrumental reasons?

Tent #4

Hmmm....so how do we know what is in this tent? Well, it looks like we've stumpled upon the right place. Here we find a terrific post on 'the relevant alternative theory of knowledge' from our friends at the Florida Student Philosophy Blog here. But don't just take my word for it: get your counterfactuals (or rather discussion on counterfactuals) here! Now if only I knew who I was . . .

Food Court

Getting hungry? Over at the carnival's world famous food court, we find this post -- from Pet Chatter -- on the question of whether we should all become vegetarians here. Yum, yum!

Tent #5

Now if only there was a good way to describe this tent . . . Hmm. I've got it! Over at The Evolving Mind there is an interesting post here on the problem of loose-fitting words. Sticks and stones may break my bones, but . . .

Tent #6

Over at the Brooks Blog, we find one post here on moral sentiments and the justification of punishment and we learn that the Archbishop of Canterbury attended the Hegel Society of Great Britain conference in Oxford here. Who ever said the Owl of Minerva takes flight only at the onset of dusk . . . ?

Tent #7

Inspired to create your own utopian carnival now that you have enjoyed a day out at this philosophers' carnival? The possibility of utopia is discussed here by Perplexicon. Perhaps utopia is in the eyes of the believer . . . ?

Come again!

I hope that you have enjoyed this edition of the Philosophers' Carnival. Please visit the Carnival website here for information on the next Carnival and how to submit posts. It has been a pleasure hosting you here at the Brooks Blog. Please do come again!

Saturday, September 05, 2009

Archbishop of Canterbury attends Hegel Society of Great Britain's annual conference



















(Left to right: Thom Brooks, Stephen Houlgate, Ken Westphal, Rowan Williams) (Photo by Kate Roessler, St Edmund Hall, Oxford)

Readers may know that each year I organize the annual Hegel Society of Great Britain (HSGB) conference: I've done this since 2004. Proceedings normally appear in the Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain. Each conference is on specific themes with the papers and following discussion excellent.

2009 has proved a special year for our annual conference (on the theme of 'Hegel and Kierkegaard'). Our group of 40+ delegates included His Grace, Dr Rowan Williams. Williams is the Archbishop of Canterbury and head of the world-wide Anglican Church, as well as a remarkable figure more generally. He is the first from Wales to hold this post.

Members of the HSGB Council were able to have lunch with him prior to the conference and he engaged -- with some genuinely excellent questions -- in several discussions. Hopefully, he'll be back at next year's conference (on the theme 'Hegel and Kant' and co-organized with the UK Kant Society) . . .

Fairness and coin flipping

A fascinating post on coin flipping and fairness can be found here. You may never look at coin flipping in the same way again . . .